Dr. John Watterson, MD, FRCPC, Rheumatologist discusses diagnosis and symptoms of osteoarthritis.

Dr. John Wade, MD, FRCP(C), talks about the various treatment options for Rheumatoid Arthritis including revolutionary second line therapies.

Dr. Maz Badii, Rheumatologist, Sarah Ware, Registered Dietician, and Nick Pratap, Kinesiologist, talk about the health benefits of bell peppers in relation to arthritis management.

Home Exercise Program - Walking; Mr. Nick Pratap, BSc, Kin, Clinical Exercise Physiologist

What is Local Rheumatologist

A local rheumatologist is a physician who has taken additional training in the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis and other diseases of the joints, muscles and bones. A local rheumatologist may treat conditions such as polymyalgia rheumatica, lupus and eosinophilic granulomatosis. Your local rheumatologist may work with your local physiotherapist, who may use techniques such as rehabilitative ultrasound, exercise and manual therapy and PRP (platelet-rich plasma). They may also work with your local family physician to create your health and wellness plan. 

Back pain symptoms can be mild or severe, and cervical (neck pain), thoracic (middle back pain), lumbar (lower back pain) or tailbone/sacral (coccydynia). Lumbar back pain is the most common type. Orthopaedic physiotherapy focuses on treating injuries or disorders of the skeletal system and associated joints, ligaments and muscles. An orthopaedic physiotherapist also helps patients with pre- and post-operative recovery and rehabilitation. 

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis, affecting millions of people worldwide. Often affecting people in their 50s and 60s, OA is caused when the cartilage on the ends of the bones wears down. Often, the bones rub against each other, causing pain and swelling. Osteoarthritis of the knee symptoms include pain, stiffness and swelling, especially when getting up in the morning. If your OA is severe, you may feel pain for the entire day, or lose your ability to use the joint. OA gets worse over time as the body grows new bone at an attempt to heal the damage. However, this results in bumps of new bone growth around the joint and the breakdown of cartilage.

Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is a type of inflammatory arthritis that affects both the joints and the skin. Like with other types of arthritis, patients with psoriatic arthritis experience pain, swelling and stiffness in the joints. It can also affect other parts of the body such as the feet, hips, knees, ribs and tendons. Along with joint problems, people develop itchy, scaly patches of inflamed skin called psoriasis. Both the acromioclavicular (AC) joint (where the clavicle meets the tip of the shoulder blade) and the glenohumeral joint (where the head of the humerus fits into the scapula) can be affected by arthritis. Symptoms of shoulder arthritis include pain, stiffness and reduced mobility. To make a diagnosis, your physician will probably recommend an x-ray.   Trouvez des informations ou des prouveurs locaux comme un rhumatologue local à montréal et à québec

Treatments for Rheumatoid Arthritis

The earlier RA is treated the better the outcome—even a few months can make a difference. Research shows that if rheumatoid arthritis is diagnosed and treated early, patients are more likely to go into remission.

It's important for patients to attend their rheumatologist appointments and maintain a healthy lifestyle. Smoking is especially known to worsen RA symptoms and make it much more difficult to treat.

Because rheumatoid arthritis is linked to heart disease, patients also need to keep their blood pressure and cholesterol at healthy levels. If you have diabetes, it's important to keep your blood sugar under control.

Medications that Treat Rheumatoid Arthritis

There are two broad groups of medications for RA: one that helps control the symptoms and one that prevents long-term joint damage. Make sure to tell your doctor about your alcohol intake and any other medications, supplements or alternative therapies you take to avoid negative interactions.

Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (DMARDs)

DMARDs are generally used to treat anyone with rheumatoid arthritis, and are often prescribed in combination with other medications.

Methotrexate is the most common Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drug. It may be given once a week as tablets or as an injection under the skin. In most patients, the injection works better than the tablets and may have fewer side effects.

 

Dr. Rajwinder Dhillon

Dr. Rajwinder Dhillon

Rheumatologist
Niagara Falls, ON
Dr. Saeed Shaikh

Dr. Saeed Shaikh

Rheumatologist
St Catharines, ON
Dr. John Dickson

Dr. John Dickson

Rheumatologist
St Catharines, ON
Dr. Sanjay Dixit

Dr. Sanjay Dixit

Rheumatologist
Burlington, ON
Dr. Jonathan Adachi

Dr. Jonathan Adachi

MD, FRCPC
Rheumatologist
Hamilton, ON
Dr. Rajendra Carmona

Dr. Rajendra Carmona

Rheumatologist
Hamilton, ON
Dr. Blumer McDonald

Dr. Blumer McDonald

Rheumatologist
Toronto, ON
Dr. Alfred Cividino

Dr. Alfred Cividino

Rheumatologist
Hamilton, ON
Dr. Nader Khalidi

Dr. Nader Khalidi

Rheumatologist
Hamilton, ON
Dr. Mark Matsos

Dr. Mark Matsos

Rheumatologist
Hamilton, ON
Dr. Margaret Larche

Dr. Margaret Larche

Rheumatologist
Hamilton, ON
Dr. Leilani Famorca

Dr. Leilani Famorca

Rheumatologist
Hamilton, ON
Dr. Elzbieta Kaminska

Dr. Elzbieta Kaminska

Rheumatologist
Hamilton, ON
Dr. Tulio Scocchia

Dr. Tulio Scocchia

Rheumatologist
Hamilton, ON
Dr. Rolf Sebaldt

Dr. Rolf Sebaldt

Rheumatologist
Hamilton, ON
Dr. Arthur Lau

Dr. Arthur Lau

Rheumatologist
Hamilton, ON
Dr. Viktoria Pavlova

Dr. Viktoria Pavlova

Rheumatologist
Ancaster, ON
Dr. Suzanne Leaf

Dr. Suzanne Leaf

Rheumatologist
St Thomas, ON
Dr. Sharon Wilkinson

Dr. Sharon Wilkinson

Rheumatologist
Burlington, ON
Dr. Vikas Pandith

Dr. Vikas Pandith

Rheumatologist
Burlington, ON
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